Manhattan Project

By | January 10, 2013

In 1965, the army agents released Bacillus globigii in the Washington National Airport and the Greyhound bus terminal. In 1966, they spread bacteria sustilus varilus in Broadway, New York station. These tips of the iceberg plutonium records seem to be science fiction. Even though they are covered in silence, they illustrate the terrorist vocation of the U.S. Government.UU.

with their own people. Although it is not easy to get information, the truth always ends up knowing. An investigation by journalist Eileen Welsome in 1993 documented the history of 18 cases of radiation in the book The Plutonium Files: America s Secret Medical Experiments in the Cold War (the plutonium files: secret medical experiments during the cold war).The work of Welsome on declassified secret files Hazel O Leary, Secretary of energy of Clinton, who promoted an investigation which in 1994 was very impressed resisted by unusual. Welsome revealed that 73 defenceless children from a Massachusetts school ingested radioactive isotopes in the Oatmeal for breakfast, a New York woman was injected with plutonium by doctors of the Manhattan Project – atomic bomb – attended a pituitary disorder, while 829 pregnant drank vitamin cocktails at a clinic in Tennessee, but actually contained radioactive iron. The Clinton Administration formed a Committee – chaired by Ruth Fade – to investigate cases of radiation in humans reported by Welsome. However, the report did not satisfy because there was not guilty. Only the apologies of the President.

Other investigations forty years later, a former student of Clinton school – a typical class obrera – neighborhood discovered that four colleagues died at the age of 40 by diseases attributed to chemical tests. The most suffered from asthma, he suffered pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses, but in a trial without guilty imposed the principle of governmental immunity. The army assured that their tests were harmless and guaranteed that the diseases were a coincidence.In the middle of the 1970s, – a quarter of a century later – the San Francisco Chronicle denounced the serratia marcescens event.


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